POSITIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES EMERGE WITH ONGOING IMPACT OF COVID-19, SAYS DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENT

Basseterre, St. Kitts, April 28, 2020 (SKNIS): Pollution and greenhouse gas emissions have drastically decreased globally as countries work to contain the spread of the Novel Coronavirus. This has resulted in positive environmental impacts, said Director in the Department of Environment, June Hughes, while giving remarks at The National Emergency Operations Center (NEOC) COVID-19 Daily Briefing for April 27, 2020.

 

As it pertains to COVID-19, the environment is probably the only sector that has benefited. With worldwide lock-downs and stay at home orders, the environmental ecosystems have actually been granted a much-needed reprieve from human interactions,” said Ms. Hughes. “It has been noted in many media articles that as vehicular and foot traffic have lessened, natural ecosystems and biodiversity have consequently begun to thrive. I am positive that when this is all over that there will be a marked decrease in global greenhouse gas emission, a much-needed break for the climate system.”

 

Ms. Hughes reiterated that the planet is finally getting the break it deserves.

 

Additionally, with a reduction in vehicular traffic and human activity overall, we are experiencing less air pollution, less pressure on our natural resources and less impact on our flora and fauna. While so, consequences of the virus have been so detrimental to the human population and the global economy, it has conversely resulted in a much-needed breather for the planet,” she said.

 

With an optimistic mindset, Ms. Hughes urged individuals to observe the practical consequences COVID-19 made to the environment.

 

I pray that the lessons we are learning from this virus impact are not lost in the noise. We have not been kind to our planet and who knows, maybe this virus is a planet fighting back,” she said. “It is my hope that our new normal provokes us into taking a much-needed new perspective on how we can discover real and lasting solutions that would be mutually beneficial, not only for mankind but also for the natural resources that sustain us.”